FAQs About Public Dental Care in Victoria

 

Dental health is often ignored by many especially if the damage is not yet visible. And let’s admit it, dental cares are quite expensive that’s why most people don’t usually go to the dentist for their daily check-up.

 

Luckily, there are Dental Health programs that provide dental care to people. Just like in the state of Victoria in Australia.

 

Their Department of Health & Human Services funded their Dental Health Services Victoria (DHSV) to provide routine and urgent dental care. Almost 79 clinics across Victoria are operated by community health and rural public health services.

 

Now, the question is, how to avail public dental health services? Below are guidelines and FAQs (frequently asked questions) about public dental care in Victoria that can help understand their services. 

 

Who are eligible for public dental care?

 
Victorians who are eligible for public dental care

Image source: thesenior.com.au

 

All Victorian children aged 0-12 years old are eligible for dental care while people aged 13 years and over with healthcare or pensioner concession card holders or dependents of concession cardholders are also eligible.

 

In special cases, children and young people in out-home care and youth justice custodial care are also provided with public dental care as well as refugees and asylum seekers.

 

Victoria’s Dental Voucher Schemes

 
Victoria’s dental voucher schemes

Image source: freepik.com

 

Since there are lots of Victorians who needed dental care, the Department of Health & Human Services sometimes relies on the private sector to provide care. Private dental clinicians provide care through three schemes:

   

Australian Government’s Child Dental Benefits Schedule

 
Australian Government’s Child Dental Benefits Schedule

Image source: hardypedoortho.com

 

The Commonwealth Child Dental Benefits Schedule assists in basic dental treatment over two years for eligible 2–17-year-old.

 
  • Eligible children pay $0 – no out of pocket costs
  • 2-17-year-olds are eligible if they receive Family Tax Benefit A External website icon or other relevant Australian Government payments
  • No waitlist – your child will have the next available appointment
 

What dental treatments are available?

 
  • Dental check-ups and cleaning teeth
  • Root canals
  • Dental X-rays
  • Extractions
  • Fissure sealants and Fillings
 

Victorians who are charged with fees for public dental care

 
Victorians who pay fees for public dental care

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Victorians aged 18 years and over who hold a health care or pensioner concession card, or who are dependents of concession cardholders are charged with fees.

 

And also children aged 0-12 years who do not hold a health care or pensioner concession card, and who are not dependents of concession cardholders. But don’t worry, these fees are a lot cheaper than regular dental care.

 

People who are fee exempted for public dental care

 
Fee exemptions

Image source: sydney.edu.au

 

Yes, some people are fee exempted when it comes to public dental care. Who are they?

 
  • people receiving care from undergraduate students
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • children and young people aged 0-17 years who hold a health care or pensioner concession card, or who are dependents of concession cardholders
  • people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness
  • refugees and asylum seekers
  • people registered with mental health and disability services, supported by a letter of recommendation from their case manager or a special developmental school
  • all children and young people who are in out-of-home care provided by the Department of Health & Human Services, up to 18 years of age
  • all people in youth justice custodial care, up to 18 years of age
 

There are plenty of ways to maintain our dental health healthy. Brushing three times a day and flossing your teeth are simple acts that can prevent you from having oral problems. And in cases wherein it’s unavoidable, then you can seek for public dental care in your place.

 

Living in New South Wales? Here are some guidelines on how to access public dental care.

Samantha Baluyot

Sam joined Remit this 2018. She is a Journalism graduate who loves to see the world in different point of views. Her goal in writing is to inspire her readers to have a better perspective and to live a meaningful life. She may look aloof but she’s a very friendly and a happy-go-lucky person.

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